The University of Alabama

Posts Tagged ‘Biodiversity’

Studying Salamanders to Size up Climate Change

A UA doctoral student’s collaborative research with the Smithsonian Institute revealed salamanders are shrinking – a phenomenon linked to climate change, researchers hypothesize.

Researchers Study Stream Ecology in the Arctic

A group of University of Alabama researchers regularly endure the Arctic’s frigid conditions to learn more about the relationships between the area’s free-flowing streams and the organisms that survive, even thrive, because of those streams.

Stalking the Ghost Bird

When Dr. Michael Steinberg was 11, he was cutting through a coastal pine forest to go fishing while he and his parents were vacationing near Fort Meyers, Fla. As he was walking, he caught sight of three big woodpeckers, two of which seemed to be engaged in some kind of courtship ritual.

Discovering Diversity

When some people refer to “rural,” you think of farmland just outside small-town Alabama. When John Clark refers to “rural,” he’s talking two days’ travel from the nearest road.

Catch and Release

A drought-interrupting rain showers a trio of anglers, but they remain undeterred from their task – despite the weather and a complete lack of interest in catching fish.

Caving for Creatures

Born eyeless, these small, white, almost transparent animals spend their lives underground and have diets that, seemingly, are mud-centered. Their very existence appears tenuous.

If A Frog Had Pockets

If anyone or anything ever needed a champion to take up its cause, it was the lowly chytrid. Not so long ago, the microscopic fungus was relatively unknown, unloved and, although it didn’t seem to impact the tiny organism’s psyche, generally regarded as unimportant. And this dismissive approach was coming from many mycologists, those botanists who specifically study fungi.

Fish Tails Galore

It’s no wonder you can hear so many good fish tales in Alabama when you consider how many different types of fish tails can be found in the state’s waters.

UA Biologist Explores ‘Abominable Mystery’ that is the World of Flowers

It’s commonly known as Japanese sweet flag, although scientists call it acorus. Prior to blooming, this plant’s long, narrow, dark green blades remind the untrained of monkey grass. However, in the laboratories of The University of Alabama’s Dr. David Oppenheimer, and in labs at three other prominent U.S. universities, this ordinary looking plant — and the nine other plant species under the researchers’ scrutiny — is likely to give scientists new insights into the “abominable mystery” that is this planet’s plant life.

Under-Appreciated River is Home to One of Continent’s Most Endangered Animals

Unlike its well-publicized and environmentally troubled neighbor, the Cahaba, Alabama’s Sipsey River doesn’t get much attention. But a pair of University of Alabama researchers, who recently studied portions of the Sipsey’s biodiversity, say waiting until environmental problems arise before appreciating the area’s richness would be a mistake.