The University of Alabama

Archive for the ‘Environmental’ Category

Sunny Days

Using sunlight to create energy may seem a simple concept, but simple ideas often take creative solutions to become reality.

Energy Supply Problem 2.0

A University of Alabama engineering professor hopes to swap rare-earth minerals used in electric machines with more abundant substitutes to drive down costs and encourage swifter adoption.

Living on the (Botanical) Edge

John Clark doesn’t seem like a violent man. Yet, a group once wondered aloud whether he was one of those “foreigners who kills people and puts them in boiling water and extracts their fat to cook with.”

Cooling Refrigeration Costs

Most people know about refrigerator magnets. How about magnetic refrigerators? A University of Alabama professor of physics says a magnetic refrigerator operating at room temperature would use a third as much electricity as a typical home refrigerator. But there’s reasons you won’t yet find one on aisle five.

Storing Captured Carbon

Three research projects, funded with nearly $13 million, involve University of Alabama scientists studying the feasibility of pumping carbon dioxide into the ground as an alternative to releasing the greenhouse gas into the atmosphere.

Cleaning the World

A device shown to reduce vehicle emissions heads down the commercialization road.

Could ‘Multi-Vitamins’ for Microbes Help Protect Marshes from Oil?

A high-tech version of a basic principle used 8,000 years ago in reducing unwanted materials is at the heart of an effort by University of Alabama scientists to lessen the Gulf oil spill’s impact on fragile coastal marshes.

Peruvian Mummies, Seashells Share Historical Climate Insight

Shells from mollusks presented to the dead during ancient funeral ceremonies are keys to helping a University of Alabama geologist gauge ocean movements near the Peruvian coast from as much as 13,000 years ago.

Researchers Study Stream Ecology in the Arctic

A group of University of Alabama researchers regularly endure the Arctic’s frigid conditions to learn more about the relationships between the area’s free-flowing streams and the organisms that survive, even thrive, because of those streams.

Forecasting Solutions

A UA hydrogeologist, who developed a computer model that became the industry standard for predicting movement of groundwater contaminants, is part of a team focusing on the nation’s most contaminated nuclear site.

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